Scientific corner

Targeting neutrophils in inflammatory bowel disease: revisiting the role of adsorptive granulocyte and monocyte apheresis

Giorgos Bamias 1Evanthia Zampeli 2Eugeni Domènech 3 Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol  2022 Jul 19;1-15. doi: 10.1080/17474124.2022.2100759.

Introduction: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the gastrointestinal tract comprising Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). While any part of the digestive tract can be affected in CD, mucosal inflammation in UC is limited to the colon. Differences and similarities between the two conditions are reflected by their pathophysiology. Areas covered: An overview of immunological aspects, pharmacological management, and biomarkers of IBD is provided. The role of adsorptive granulocyte and monocyte apheresis (GMA) is reviewed including its primary and secondary effects on the immune system, as well as clinical studies in IBD (mainly UC), and potential biomarkers for adsorptive GMA. Expert opinion: In UC, adsorptive GMA with Adacolumn (Adacolumn®, JIMRO Co., Ltd. Takasaki, Gunma, Japan) selectively depletes elevated myeloid lineage leukocytes and has a range of beneficial secondary immune effects. Adsorptive GMA is a safe and effective non-pharmacological treatment option for UC. Pilot studies have reported promising results for adsorptive GMA in combination with biological agents, although larger studies are required. Fecal calprotectin concentrations, neutrophil counts in histological samples and/or the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio in peripheral blood may prove to be useful biomarkers for predicting GMA effectiveness in the future.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35833363/

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/epub/10.1080/17474124.2022.2100759?needAccess=true

Scientific corner

Novel Prognostic Biomarkers of Mucosal Healing in Ulcerative Colitis Patients Treated With Anti-TNF: Neutrophil-toLymphocyte Ratio and Platelet-to-Lymphocyte Ratio

Lorenzo Bertani 1Federico Rossari 2Brigida Barberio 3Maria Giulia Demarzo 4Gherardo Tapete 1Eleonora Albano 1Giovanni Baiano Svizzero 1Linda Ceccarelli 5Maria Gloria Mumolo 5Chiara Brombin 6Nicola de Bortoli 1Massimo Bellini 1Santino Marchi 1Giorgia Bodini 4Edoardo Savarino 3Francesco Costa 5

Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2020 Sep 18;26(10):1579-1587. doi: 10.1093/ibd/izaa062.

Background: Anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs (anti-TNFs) are widely used for the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC). However, many patients experience loss of response during the first year of therapy. An early predictor of clinical remission and mucosal healing is needed. The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) are markers of subclinical inflammation poorly evaluated in UC patients treated with anti-TNFs. The aim of this multicenter study was to evaluate whether NLR and PLR could be used as prognostic markers of anti-TNF treatment response. Methods: Patients with UC who started anti-TNF treatment in monotherapy were evaluated. Patients with concomitant corticosteroid treatment ≥20 mg were excluded. We calculated NLR, PLR, and fecal calprotectin before treatment and after induction. The values of NLR and PLR were correlated with clinical remission and mucosal healing at the end of follow-up (54 weeks) using the Mann-Whitney U test and then multivariate analysis was conducted. Results: Eighty-eight patients were included. Patients who reached mucosal healing after 54 weeks of therapy displayed lower levels of both baseline NLR and PLR (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.04, respectively); similar results were obtained at week 8 (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.001, respectively). Patients who presented with active ulcers at baseline endoscopic evaluation had higher baseline NLR and PLR values compared with those without detected ulcers (P = 0.002 and P = 0.0007, respectively). Conclusions: Both NLR and PLR showed a promising role as early predictors of therapeutic response to anti-TNF therapy in UC patients. If confirmed in larger studies, classification and regression trees proposed in this article could be useful to guide clinical decisions regarding anti-TNF treatment.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32232392/

Scientific corner

Leukocytapheresis in pediatric patients with ulcerative colitis

Takeshi Tomomasa 1Hitoshi TajiriSeiichi KagimotoToshiaki ShimizuAtsushi YodenKosuke UshijimaKeiichi UchidaHiroaki KanekoDaiki AbukawaMutsuko KonnoShun-ichi MaisawaTakao KohsakaAkio KobayashiJapanese Study Group for Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2011 Jul;53(1):34-9. doi: 10.1097/MPG.0b013e31821058bc.

Objective: Leukocytapheresis (LCAP) is a nonpharmacologic therapy that has recently been used to treat ulcerative colitis (UC). This multicenter open-label study prospectively assessed the efficacy and safety of LCAP in pediatric patients with UC. Patients and methods: Twenty-three patients ages 8 to 16 years with moderate (n = 19) to severe (n = 4) steroid-resistant UC were enrolled. One of 2 LCAP columns with different volumes (model EX and the half-volume model EI) was selected, according to body weight. LCAP was performed once per week for 5 consecutive weeks. Clinical and laboratory data were collected at predetermined time points. The primary endpoint was decreased stool frequency/hematochezia score, and secondary endpoints were clinical, laboratory, and endoscopic improvements. Results: The stool frequency/hematochezia score decreased significantly from 4.5 ± 1.2 before treatment to 1.6 ± 1.9 after the fifth treatment. Clinical parameters, including stool frequency, presence of visible blood, abdominal pain, and body temperature, were significantly improved. Fecal calprotectin decreased significantly. Endoscopic findings evaluated using Matts score also improved (P < 0.01). The steroid dose decreased from 1.1 ± 0.4 mg/kg before treatment to 0.8 ± 0.5 mg/kg after treatment. There were no significant differences in changes between the EX and EI columns. The incidence of adverse effects was 61%, although none was serious. The most common adverse effects were decreased hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration. Conclusions: The present study showed that LCAP was well tolerated in children with UC, mostly moderate, and was as effective as in adults. The types of pediatric patients best suited to LCAP remain to be determined.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21694533/

Leukocytapheresis in Pediatric Patients With Ulcerative Coli… : Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (lww.com)

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