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Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Comprehensive Review

Zhaobei Cai 1 2Shu Wang 3Jiannan Li 1 Front Med (Lausanne)  2021 Dec 20;8:765474. doi: 10.3389/fmed.2021.765474. eCollection 2021.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as a global disease, has attracted much research interest. Constant research has led to a better understanding of the disease condition and further promoted its management. We here reviewed the conventional and the novel drugs and therapies, as well as the potential ones, which have shown promise in preclinical studies and are likely to be effective future therapies. The conventional treatments aim at controlling symptoms through pharmacotherapy, including aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, and biologics, with other general measures and/or surgical resection if necessary. However, a considerable fraction of patients do not respond to available treatments or lose response, which calls for new therapeutic strategies. Diverse therapeutic options are emerging, involving small molecules, apheresis therapy, improved intestinal microecology, cell therapy, and exosome therapy. In addition, patient education partly upgrades the efficacy of IBD treatment. Recent advances in the management of IBD have led to a paradigm shift in the treatment goals, from targeting symptom-free daily life to shooting for mucosal healing. In this review, the latest progress in IBD treatment is summarized to understand the advantages, pitfalls, and research prospects of different drugs and therapies and to provide a basis for the clinical decision and further research of IBD.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34988090/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8720971/

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Leukocyte adsorption apheresis for the treatment of pyoderma gangrenosum

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Management of cutaneous disorders related to inflammatory bowel disease

Zaira Pellicer,a Jesus Manuel Santiago,b Alejandro Rodriguez,b Vicent Alonso,a Rosario Antón,b and Marta Maia Boscab ,Ann Gastroenterol. 2012; 25(1): 21–26.

Almost one-third of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) develop skin lesions. Cutaneous disorders associated with IBD may be divided into 5 groups based on the nature of the association: specific manifestations (orofacial and metastatic IBD), reactive disorders (erythema nodosum, pyoderma gangrenosum, pyodermatitis-pyostomatitis vegetans, Sweet’s syndrome and cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa), miscellaneous (epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullous pemphigoid, linear IgA bullous disease, squamous cell carcinoma-Bowen’s disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, secondary amyloidosis and psoriasis), manifestations secondary to malnutrition and malabsorption (zinc, vitamins and iron deficiency), and manifestations secondary to drug therapy (salicylates, immunosupressors, biological agents, antibiotics and steroids). Treatment should be individualized and directed to treating the underlying IBD as well as the specific dermatologic condition. The aim of this review includes the description of clinical manifestations, course, work-up and, most importantly, management of these disorders, providing an assessment of the literature on the topic.

Management of cutaneous disorders related to inflammatory bowel disease (nih.gov)

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An open-label prospective randomized multicenter study shows very rapid remission of ulcerative colitis by intensive granulocyte and monocyte adsorptive apheresis as compared with routine weekly treatment

Atsushi Sakuraba 1Satoshi MotoyaKenji WatanabeMasakazu NishishitaKazunari KankeToshiyuki MatsuiYasuo SuzukiTadayuki OshimaReiko KunisakiTakayuki MatsumotoHiroyuki HanaiKen FukunagaNaoki YoshimuraToshimi ChibaShinsuke FunakoshiNobuo AoyamaAkira AndohHiroshi NakaseYohei MizutaRyoichi SuzukiTaiji AkamatsuMasahiro IizukaToshifumi AshidaToshifumi Hibi

Intensive GMA in patients with active UC seems to be more efficacious than weekly treatment, and significantly reduced the patients’ morbidity time without increasing the incidence of side effects.

)https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19724269/

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