Scientific corner

Su1934-Safety of granulocyte and monocyte adsorptive apheresis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease undergoing concomitant treatment with immunosuppressant medications: a multicenter cohort study

Maki Miyakawa, Hiroki Tanaka, Tomoyoshi Shibuya,Taro Osada, Eiji Hosoi Gastroenterol. 2019 156 (6) Suppl.S-666–S-667

Background: Few studies have assessed the safety of granulocyte and monocyte adsorptive apheresis (GMA) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) undergoing concomitant treatment with multiple immunosuppressant medications. To address this research gap, we investigated adverse effects associated with GMA in patients with IBD treated with multiple immunosuppressants  who  participated  in  the  “Post-marketing  surveillance  study  on  the safety and response of GMA treatment in patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis with at least one special situation who received Adacolumn® (PARTICULAR).” Methods: The PARTICULAR study was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD) who received GMA between November 2013 and March 2017. Patients meeting at least one of the following special situation were enrolled: elderly (<=65 years) or pediatric/adolescent (>=18 years) patients, patients with anemia, or patients undergoing concomitant treatment with multiple immunosuppressants. GMA was performed using Adacolumn® (JIMRO, Takasaki, Japan). Each patient received up to 11 GMA sessions, and all adverse events (AEs) during the study period were recorded. The incidence of AEs was investigated relative to the number and type of immunosuppressants using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: A total of 437 patients (368 UC, 69 CD) from 93 institutions were included. Of these, 140, 169, 101, and 27 patients received none, 1, 2, and >=3 immunosuppressants, respectively. In total, 125 patients received multiple immunosuppressants. Concomitant prednisolone, immunomodulators, anti-tumor necrosis factor agents, and calcineurin inhibitors were administered in 189, 151, 89, and 24 patients, respectively. The incidence of AEs was 11% in all 437 patients and 8%, 12%, 12%, and 26% in patients receiving none, 1, 2, and >=3 immunosuppressants, respectively. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, anemia and concomitant immunosuppressants were independently associated with the incidence of AEs. Particularly, a higher number of concomitant immunosuppressants showed an increasing trend with odds ratios related to AEs. In contrast, concomitant corticosteroids were associated with a reduced risk of AEs. Nausea/vomiting and headache were the most common AEs in patients on multiple immunosuppressant medications (5.6% and 3.2%, respectively). Conclusions: Concomitant treatment with immunosuppressants was independently associated with the incidence of AEs such as nausea/vomiting and headache in patients with IBD receiving GMA. As the number of concomitant immunosuppressants increased, the incidence of AEs also increased. However, our data also suggest that GMA is safe in patients with IBD receiving prednisolone.

https://www.gastrojournal.org/action/doSearch?text1=granulocyte+and+monocyte+apheresis+&field1=AllField&AfterYear=2018&BeforeYear=2021&pageSize=50&startPage=&SeriesKey=ygast

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Tu1711 – Safety and Effectiveness of Granulocyte and Monocyte Adsorptive Apheresis in 125 Elderly Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Multicenter Cohort Study

Hiroki Tanaka, Satoshi Motoya, Tomoyoshi Shibuya, Satoshi Tanida, Seiichiro Kokuma, Eiji Hosoi Gastroenterology 2018 154 (6) Suppl.S-996–S-997

Background: There are few studies on the usefulness of granulocyte and monocyte adsorptive apheresis (GMA) in elderly patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We investigated the safety and effectiveness of GMA in elderly patients who participated in the Post-marketing Surveillance Study of GMA Using Adacolumn® for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Who Have Special Situations (PARTICULAR). Methods: The PARTICULAR study is a retrospective, multicenter cohort study that included patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD) who received GMA between November 2013 and March 2017. Patients with at least one special situation, including elderly patients, patients with anemia, and patients undergoing concomitant treatment with multiple immunosuppressants (IMs) were enrolled. Patients aged # 64 years were excluded from this study. GMA was performed using Adacolumn® (JIMRO, Takasaki, Japan). Each patient received up to a maximum of 11 GMA sessions. The safety of GMA was assessed in all patients. The effectiveness of GMA was assessed in patients with UC with a partial UC disease activity index (pUC-DAI) score of $ 3. Remission was defined as a pUC-DAI score of # 2. Patients receiving concomitant treatment with infliximab, adalimumab, or calcineurin inhibitors were excluded from the effectiveness assessment. The incidence of adverse events (AEs) and remission rates were compared between elderly patients with and without any special situation using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 125 elderly patients (118 UC, 7 CD) from 93 institutions were included. The median age was 73.2 years. Fifty-six patients did not have any special situation, and 69 had at least one or more special situations. The incidence of AEs was 11.2% in all patients. The incidence of AEs was significantly lower in elderly patients without any special situation (3.6%) than in those with at least one or more special situations (17.4%) (Figure 1A). AEs significantly occurred in elderly patients with anemia (21.9%) and on multiple concomitant IMs (23.8%) compared to those without any special situation (3.6%). Anemia and multiple concomitant IMs were identified as independent predictors for a higher incidence of AEs (Table 1). The effectiveness of GMA was assessed in 92 patients with UC. The remission rate was 48.9%. No difference was observed in the remission rate between elderly patients without any special situation (52.2%) and those with at least one or more special situations (45.7%) (Figure 1B). Conclusions: A low incidence of AEs (3.6%) was found in elderly IBD patients receiving GMA without any special situation. Remission was achieved by GMA in 48.6% of the elderly UC patients. Care should be taken when using GMA in elderly IBD patients with anemia or on multiple concomitant IMs

Scientific corner

Safety and efficacy of granulocyte/monocyte apheresis in steroid-dependent active ulcerative colitis with insufficient response or intolerance to immunosuppressants and/or biologics (ART trial): 12-week interim results.

Axel Dignass 1Ayesha Akbar 2Ailsa Hart 2Sreedhar Subramanian 3Gilles Bommelaer 4Daniel C Baumgart 5Jean-Charles Grimaud 6Guillaume Cadiot 7Richard Makins 8Syed Hoque 9Guillaume Bouguen 10Bruno Bonaz 11 , J Crohns Colitis. 2016 Jul;10(7):812-20. 

At Week 12, Adacolumn provided significant clinical benefit in a large cohort of steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis patients with previous failure to immunosuppressant and/or biologic treatment, with a favourable safety profile. These results are consistent with previous studies and support Adacolumn use in this difficult-to-treat patient subgroup.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26818659/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4955912/pdf/jjw032.pdf

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Potential role of granulocyte/monocyte adsorptive apheresis for ulcerative colitis with concomitant CMV infection: authors’ reply

H. NakaseM. MatsuuraT. Chibam , https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2010.04552.x

These new data suggest that GMAA might be safe and effective for UC patients positive for CMV because it does not cause CMV reactivation. Because CMV reactivation might affect the clinical outcome of patients with refractory UC,5 GMAA could be a promising option for UC patients with CMV infection. A new clinical trial with a larger number of patients is ongoing to evaluate further the effects of GMA on UC patients with CMV infection.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2010.04552.x

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