Scientific corner

Clinical and immunological effects of adsorptive myeloid lineage leukocyte apheresis in patients with immune disorders.

Takuro Kanekura 1, J Dermatol 2018 Aug;45(8):943-950

These actions render GMA a unique non-pharmacological treatment option for patients with chronic dermatoid conditions, which are difficult to treat with pharmacological preparations.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29782055/

Scientific corner

Granulocyte and Monocyte Adsorption Apheresis for Refractory Skin Diseases due to Activated Neutrophils, Psoriasis, and Associated Arthropathy.

Masanao Sakanoue 1Koichiro TakedaKazuhiro KawaiTakuro Kanekura, Ther Apher Dial. 2013 Oct;17(5):477-83.

Granulocyte and monocyte adsorption apheresis (GMA), an extracorporeal apheresis instrument whose column contains cellulose acetate (CA) beads, is designed to remove activated granulocytes and monocytes. We previously demonstrated that GMA was useful for treating neutrophilic dermatoses and associated arthropathy as it adsorbs Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18)-expressing neutrophils to the CA beads by the binding of complement component (iC3b) and CD11b expressed on activated neutrophils. The objective of this study is to further assess the clinical effectiveness of GMA in the treatment of neutrophilic dermatoses and associated arthropathy. The effect of GMA for skin lesions and joint lesions was assessed in 44 and 23 patients, respectively. Mac-1 expression on peripheral neutrophils was measured by flow cytometry. Skin lesions and arthropathy improved in 39 of 44 patients (88.6%) and 22 of 23 (95.6%), respectively. Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) expression on the peripheral neutrophils, 27.1 ± 6.66 MFI (mean fluorescence intensity) before treatment, was reduced to 17.9 ± 3.02 MFI by GMA (P < 0.05). Clinical effectiveness of GMA for the treatment of intractable neutrophilic dermatoses and associated arthropathy was further confirmed.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24107275/

Scientific corner

Human neutrophil Fc receptor-mediated adhesion under flow: a hollow fibre model of intravascular arrest

C D’Arrigo 1J J Candal-CoutoM GreerD J VealeJ M Woof Clin Exp Immunol 1995 Apr;100(1):173-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2249.1995.tb03620.x.

Human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) were found to adhere to a novel model of blood vessel wall-associated IgG. The internal surfaces of cellulose acetate hollow fibres, of comparable internal diameter to small blood vessels, were coated with normal serum human IgG, heat-aggregated IgG (HAIgG), laminin or fibrinogen. Under conditions of flow mimicking those in a small vessel, PMN were found to adhere markedly only to immunoglobulin-coated fibres. Arrest on HAIgG was inhibited by excess soluble IgG but not by bovine serum albumin (BSA), demonstrating that the adhesion was IgG-specific and presumably mediated by Fc gamma R on the PMN surface. Pre-adsorption of serum components onto HAIgG-coated fibres enhanced PMN arrest, due most probably to fixation of complement components by immobilized HAIgG, resulting in additional potential to entrap PMN via complement receptors such as CR3. Treatment of PMN with the regulatory neuropeptide substance P also enhanced adhesion to HAIgG-coated fibres and caused increased surface expression of Fc gamma RI, Fc gamma RII and Fc gamma RIII. A mouse cell line derived from L cells, hR4C6, stably transfected with human Fc gamma RII, was found to adhere under flow to HAIgG-coated fibres, whilst untransfected parent L cells did not. This adhesion was similarly inhibited by excess soluble IgG, confirming the capability of Fc gamma R to mediate cell arrest. The study strongly suggests that Fc gamma R may play an important role in intravascular PMN arrest and we speculate that in inflammatory diseases PMN may adhere via Fc gamma R to immobilized immunoglobulin on the vascular endothelium, with subsequent degranulation and tissue damage.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7535210/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1534271/

Contact UsFor more information

Contact Us